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Fact Sheet:
Minimum GPA (Undergraduate): 2.5 Minimum GPA (Graduate): 3.0
Language of Instruction: English Housing: Flat/Apartment
Number of Credits Offered: 12-16 Eligible Population: 02 Sophomore, 03 Junior, 04 Senior, Graduate
Type of Program: Internship Open to non-Mason Students: Yes
Program Description:
Budapest Migration

Budapest Semester Internship Placements

Migration and the Refugee Crisis in Europe Internship Program

Overview

According to estimates, over one million refugees and migrants entered the European Union since 2015. This tidal wave of migration has been caused by wars in Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, poverty in states such as Kosovo and Albania, and unrest and uncertainty in a number of other states outside Europe. At the same time, a number of factors have attracted these migrants to Europe, including jobs, safety, and family unification. The refugees’ plight has sparked an unparalleled humanitarian crisis which has not been seen since the World War II leading to an ongoing political turmoil with far reaching implications beyond Europe’s borders. The crisis has led to new political and social divisions causing realignments within the Europe Union, and leading to an intense debate on how Europe should handle the crisis both on its external borders and inside the continent. The Brexit vote is a case in point. 

This unique and innovative semester program offers students an unparalleled opportunity to closely examine these issues by focusing on topics such as humanitarian and asylum law, migrant absorption policies, border security, racism and xenophobia, opposition to integration of refugees, cultural preservation and international cooperation. As such, students will explore existing tensions between state sovereignty on the one hand, and transnationalism on the other, and the growing controversy on the future of the European Union.

While the crisis has directly affected countries like Greece and Germany as a point of entry or intended destination, respectively, Hungary has been in the forefront of the debate for its radical, rejectionist policy which stands in stark contrast to the “open door” approach advocated by the Western European members of the EU.  In contrast, many organizations within Hungary's vibrant civil society have been advocating alternative approaches to the government's position. Therefore, studying these topics in Hungary presents students with a unique vantage point on migration and the new refugees of Europe, making Budapest a highly attractive venue for studying this phenomenon. 


Program Details

Budapest Semester InternshipThis semester program is based in Budapest, Hungary, one of the most beautiful cities in Europe and a perfect location for studying migration and refugee issues. Students will enroll in three classes two days per week: External and Internal Determinants of the Recent Global Migration to Europe: A Sociological ApproachInternational Law, Migration, and the Media: EU Migration Policy and the Response to the Current Migration and Refugee CrisisPolitical Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism: Migration and Refugee Issues. Students will work as interns in various organizations in Budapest three days per week. Students will be housed in shared fully furnished apartments in downtown Budapest with all amenities. Housing is in close proximity to public transportation. During the program, students can look forward to a three-day field in Serbia. While there, you may have the opportunity to visit refugee camps and meet with refugees, as well as Hungarian, Serbian, United Nations officials, and representatives of the myriad NGOs involved in assisting the refugees. 

Hungary is located in the heart of Europe with perfect access to Western and Eastern Europe, convenient for weekend trips and spring break trips.  <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
Internship Credit Course Credit
6 credits (Undergraduate) | 3 credits (Graduate) 9 credits

Internship

Class 1

Class 2

Class 3

External and Internal Determinants of the Recent Global Migration to Europe: A Sociological Approach Regular and Forced Migration: Institutions, Legal Norms, and Moral Issues Political Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism: Migration and Refugee Issues
3 credits 3 credits 3 credits
Internship course taught in English by Mason Professor Yehuda Lukacs, PhD in Budapest Taught in English by Professor Antal Örkény Taught in English by Professor Boldizsár Nagy Taught in English by Professor Frank Zsigó
Seeking credit for the following undergraduate courses:
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 390 - International Internship in Budapest (6 credits) - default
  • Anthropology (ANTH) 396 - Internship in Budapest (6 credits)
  • Global Affairs (GLOA) 495 - Internship in Budapest (6 credits)
  • Conflict Analysis and Resolution (CONF) 385 - Internship in Budapest (6 credits)
  • Government (GOVT) 480 - Internship in Budapest (3 credits) + Government (GOVT) 398 - Study Abroad in Budapest (3 credits)
Seeking credit for the following graduate courses:
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 595 - Internship in Budapest (3 credits) - default
Seeking credit for the following undergraduate courses:
  • Anthropology (ANTH) 331 - Refugees 
  • Conflict Analysis and Resolution (CONF) 397 - Global Migration
  • Global Affairs (GLOA) 480 - Global Migration
  • Government (GOVT) 444 - Global Migration
  • Honors (HNRS) 131 - Contemporary Society in Multiple Perspectives
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 399 - Global Migration - default
  • Sociology (SOCI) 395 - Global Migration
Seeking credit for the following graduate courses:
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 595 - Global Migration  - default
  • Sociology (SOCI) 624 - International Migration in the Age of Globalization
Seeking credit for the following undergraduate courses:
  • Anthropology (ANTH) 398 - International Law, Migration and Media
  • Conflict Analysis and Resolution (CONF) 397 - Study Abroad Special Topics
  • Global Affairs (GLOA) 480 - International Law, Migration and Media
  • Government (GOVT) 444 - International Law, Migration and Media
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 399 - International Law, Migration and Media - default
  • Sociology (SOCI) 395 - International Law, Migration and Media
Seeking credit for the following graduate courses:
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 595 - International Law, Migration and Media  - default
Seeking credit for the following undergraduate courses:
  • Conflict Analysis and Resolution (CONF) 397 - Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism
  • Global Affairs (GLOA) 480 - Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism
  • Government (GOVT) 398 - Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism
  • Honors (HNRS) 130 - Conceptions of Self
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 399 - Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism - default
  • Philosophy (PHIL) 327 - Contemporary Western Political Theory
Seeking credit for the following graduate courses:
  • Integrative Studies (INTS) 595 - Theory of Pluralism and Multiculturalism  - default


Internship Placement Process

Budapest Semester Internship Application Checklist

The internship component involves students working 24 hours per week for four months at non-governmental, inter-governmental or governmental bodies. Students are individually placed and contribute to the work of these organizations with missions directly related to the program's theme. Students may be placed in organizations that focus on refugee integration, conflict resolution, human rights, housing and medical services, intercultural communication, research, and more. Placements are also available at organizations which focus on helping victims of violence, children, migrants from specific regions (including Middle East and Africa), and other populations. Learn more about the Internship Placement Process.

Past internship sites have included but are not limited to: Center for European Neighborhood StudiesTom Lantos Institute, and Open Society Archives. Students can anticipate being placed in internship sites of similar caliber and directly related to the program's theme and focus while also taking into consideration the individual's personal and professional aspirations. 

Credits Offered

The  Semester in Budapest offers students a combination of a three-day per week professional internship, and three high level, academically challenging courses that examine the empirical sociology, legal and humanitarian foundations, and also the philosophical and political underpinnings of the crisis. The three courses are held at King Zsigmond University in Budapest and taught by three senior Hungarian professors who are experts in these fields. 

Undergraduate

Undergraduate students take a 6-credit internship course taught by a Mason professor in Budapest. Students should speak to their academic advisor and their undergraduate program director about applying internship credit to their degree. Some undergraduate programs have independent research and special topics credit that may apply to this program. Some departments have specific requirements for receiving internship credit. Students are responsible for initiating the conversation with the academic department and communicating said requirements to Mason Study Abroad. Students must comply with department requirements in order to receive internship credit. Undergraduate students also take three 3-credit courses taught in English by Hungarian professors. See table above for more information.

Graduate

Graduate students must seek approval from their graduate program advisor prior to applying to the program. Graduate students take a 3-credit internship course taught by a Mason professor in Budapest. Some graduate programs have practicum, independent research, and special topics credit that may apply to this program. Departments are likely to have specific requirements for receiving credit for the international internship; the student is responsible for initiating the conversation with the academic department and communicating said requirements to Mason Study Abroad. Students must comply with department requirements in order to receive internship credit. Graduate students take three 3-credit courses taught in English by Hungarian professors. See table above for more information. 

Eligibility

This program is open to all graduate and undergraduate students who meet the GPA requirement. Undergraduate students should have 45 undergraduate credits completed by the start date of the program. Graduate students should have completed at least one semester of graduate work by the start date of the program. Students from all universities are eligible to participate. 

Housing

Student housing for the semester is in shared student apartments in downtown Budapest. Apartments are centrally located and near public transportation, fully furnished, and have wi-fi included. Housing assignments will be made and communicated before the university closes for winter break. During Orientation week, students stay in double rooms at Erzsebet Hotel.

Visa Information

An entry visa is not required for US citizens, but visa requirements may vary for non-US citizens. Learn more about Hungary's visa and entry requirements here. Non-US citizens should speak with the On-Site Director prior to submitting their visa application.

Program Cost (Spring Semester 2018): $12,195

Included:

  • Tuition (15 credits - undergraduate; 12 credits - graduate)
  • Housing - shared student apartment for the semester, double rooms at Erzsebet Hotel during Orientation. *Single rooms are available at an additional cost of $2,650. 
  • Internship placement and on-site support
  • Guided sightseeing tours, including entrance fees to museums
  • Guest speakers and professional site visits
  • Hungarian University ID entitling students to significant discounts for public transportation (King Zsigmond College)
  • Three-day field trip to Serbia to visit refugee camps, including guides, transportation, accommodations, and two daily meals
  • Pre-Departure Orientation
  • International Emergency Insurance

Not Included:

  • International airfare
  • Most meals
  • Visa application fee (if applicable)
  • Personal expenses
  • Personal transportation

Links and Resources

Program Links

Travel & Visa Links

Mason Links


Contact Information

On-Site Director

Yehuda Lukacs, PhD
Associate Professor Emeritus, Global Affairs, George Mason University
ylukacs@gmu.edu

Program Officer

Whitney Morgan
wmorgan2@gmu.edu
703-993-4798



Dates / Deadlines:
Term Year App Deadline Decision Date Start Date End Date
Spring Semester 2018 12/11/2017 ** Rolling Admission 01/24/2018 05/31/2018

** Indicates rolling admission application process. Applicants will be immediately notified of acceptance into this program and be able to complete post-decision materials prior to the term's application deadline.